BNZ Start-Up Alley ’17 finalists

We’re delighted to once again host Start-up Alley in conjunction with BNZ! 2017 saw the highest number of entries we’ve had and a wide range of really amazing companies. We had to choose six finalists, though, and here they are…

CLVR

CLVR

“We’re excited about engaging with other start-ups and the innovation community as part of BNZ Start-up Alley ’17. Clvr applications harness AI for improved human interactions.”
Marc Potter – CLVR

 

Collaborate

Collaborate

“We are so grateful to be one of the finalists for Webstock Start-up Alley 2017. Collaborate Wellington is maximising the capacity of community organisations and empowering individuals to create positive change through transforming the landscape of volunteering.”
Ceara McAuliffe Bickerton – Collaborate

 

Curtis

Curtis

“At Authentic we’re super passionate about building platforms for the GLAM sector. We can’t wait to introduce Curtis to the Webstock community and the rest of the world.”
Glen Barnes – Curtis

 

Datatag

Datatag

“The team at Butler Robotics are honored to be part of the BNZ Start-Up Alley at Webstock ’17.

We are excited to present DataTag, our new community platform for processing Big Data into datasets, to be used with AI.”
Cathy Butler – Butler Robotics

 

Genoapay

Genoapay

“Wow what a privilege! 2017 is looking like an incredible year for Genoapay and we are excited about this opportunity to pitch our Vision.

Genoapay is an ambitious and disruptive startup changing the way people pay for goods and services. The Omni channel payments solution allows consumers to get what they need now and pay for it over time with no interest ever!”
Shaun Quincey – Genoapay

 

MY F.C.

MY F.C.

“What a fantastic start to the year! We’re so honoured to be selected as a finalist for BNZ’s Start-up Alley. We look forward to sharing our passion and product in a competitive environment filled with innovative and entrepreneurial kiwis.”
Mike Simpson – MY F.C

Stripe comes to New Zealand!

We’re delighted to announce that Webstock 16 sponsor, Stripe, is now open in private beta for New Zealand businesses. We talked with Susan Wu, Market Lead for Stripe Australia and New Zealand, about this.

Webstock: So, give us the quick overview of what Stripe is, what you do, and the changes you’re making.

Stripe: Stripe is a set of tools for building and running an internet business. We help businesses accept payments from anyone, anywhere, and build new kinds of companies like Kickstarter or Lyft.

From marketplaces and mobile apps to online storefronts and subscription services, Stripe simplifies complex financial flows. Beyond just processing a payment, our growing stack helps businesses with everything from accounting, billing and paying out to third parties, to fraud protection and optimising for mobile. The Stripe dashboard helps users manage their businesses in real time.

Part of the promise of the internet is that physical location should be largely irrelevant. When it comes to buying or selling online today, we’re still a long way from realising this. Stripe aims to make that happen. By reducing the barriers to starting and operating a business regardless of location or means, Stripe hopes to bring more would-be companies online and accelerate the internet economy. Internally we say our goal is to increase the GDP of the internet.

Webstock: One thing a lot of people love about Stripe is the ease of use. Compared to, well, just about anything else to do with credit cards transactions. Was that a conscious point of differentiation right from the start?

Stripe: Absolutely! Having built and launched software on the internet for years, our founders — Patrick and John — experienced the difficulty of accepting online payments first-hand. They often opted to give the product away for free, rather than go through the time and pain of setting up a merchant account and gateway online.

On almost every front, it was becoming easier to build and launch an online business. Payments, however, remained dominated by clunky legacy players. It seemed clear that there should be a developer-focused, instant-setup payment platform that would scale to any size. That’s really where it all began.

Webstock: The big news for Webstock is that Stripe has just opened a private beta for New Zealand customers! Firstly, what took you so long getting here? 😉 Secondly, what does this mean from NZ businesses and how do they become part of this?

Stripe: Sorry we kept you waiting! 🙂 We try to be pretty thoughtful in our approach to new markets we enter, and that often means that things may take a little longer than we’d like. That said, we’re really excited to announce that we are now in private beta in NZ!

Any NZ business can now sign up to our waiting list on stripe.com/global. We’ll be issuing local invites and accepting merchants over the course of the coming weeks and months. Once we’re fully launched, any business will be able to sign up for Stripe and begin accepting money in just a few minutes. We’d love to hear from any NZ businesses that are keen to learn more, so feel free to say hi to the Stripe team at Webstock or drop us a line on [email protected] with any questions!

Webstock: We’re delighted to have Stripe as a sponsor for Webstock! How did you hear about Webstock and tell us a little about why you’re supporting it.

Stripe: Webstock’s reputation as one of the coolest events in the tech industry has spread far and wide. We’re unapologetic in believing the internet matters and share Webstock’s appreciation for the web and those who craft it.

We fundamentally believe that developers are changing the world and that’s why we’ve always put them first. Endless new kinds of businesses, services, and creative undertakings are now possible — however, 20 years into the web, we’ve still explored only a small fraction of the web’s potential. Like Webstock, we’re focused on advancing the internet and making it a more inclusive place for everyone. We’re genuinely thrilled to support Webstock (especially as you reach your 10th birthday!) and are really looking forward to supporting the local NZ tech community.

Webstock: Another item in the “pretty exciting news” category, is the just announced partnership with Xero. Can you tell us a little about how that came about and what it means?

Stripe: Yes! Pretty exciting indeed 🙂 After many requests from both Stripe and Xero users, we’ve teamed up to make it even easier for Xero users to accept credit and debit card payments from their customers. Now, whenever someone signs up for Xero, they can be automatically provided with a Stripe account. By enabling their Stripe account, Xero users will be able to attach a “Pay with Credit Card” button to any invoice and seamlessly receive payment from their customers no matter where they are in the world. We’re really happy to announce the partnership and look forward to developing some cool new integrations in the not-so-distant future. You can read more about it here.

Thanks Susan! Great to have Stripe as part of Webstock 16.

BNZ Start-Up Alley ’16 finalists

Wow! Our fifth Start-up Alley, in conjunction with BNZ! There was a great range of entries and some really strong applications. In the end, we had to choose six finalists. Here they are…

Good luck everyone!

Givahoy

Givahoy
“This is an amazing opportunity. Givahoy is an ambitious startup looking to enable safe, easy and fun app-based proximity microtransactions in a cashless world, primarily for charities.

But that’s just the start…”
Jim Boutcher – Givahoy

 

Kandid

Kandid
“We’re honoured and humbled to be selected amongst the finalists for Webstock Start-up Alley ’16. Can’t wait to see you all down in Welly! 🙂

Kandid is a mutually beneficial platform for New Zealand’s best developers and companies, to keep up to date and connect with the tech industry.”
Ezra Keddell – Kandid

 

Leaping Tiger

Leaping Tiger
“On behalf of the team at Leaping Tiger we are honoured to be selected as a finalist in BNZ’s Startup Alley!

Leaping Tiger is shaping a future for gamers where anonymity and faceless usernames are no longer commonplace. Wherever you are in the world you can find new friends, local communities and events – all in your local area. We are excited to share more about our vision with you this February.”
Jordan Lilley – Leaping Tiger

 

Little Yellow Bird

Little Yellow Bird
“We’re so excited to be a finalist in this years BNZ Startup Alley and introducing our products to even more people in 2016.”
Samantha Jones – Little Yellow Bird

 

Vizbot

Vizbot
“The Vizbot team are super excited to be selected as finalists for the BNZ Start-Up Alley 2016. Smart, simple building consents are another step closer to becoming a reality!”
Matt Cobham – Vizbot

 

Wireless Guard

Wireless Guard
“Wireless Guard is thrilled to be part of BNZ’s Start-up Alley and share our new smart security device with the Webstock’16 community.”
Taylor Howatson – Wireless Guard

Seven things: Jason Webley

1) Who are you?
I’m a musician and storyteller from the town of Everett, Washington, which is a town about thirty miles outside Seattle.

2) What do you do?
I used to tour around all the time stomping and screaming songs. But these days I’ve been building a houseboat, fixing up some old houses and cabins, and occasionally making up songs about giraffes and dead people.

3) How did you end up here?
Which “here” do you mean? This unlikely and lovely plane of existence, or Webstock? I’m still figuring out the first one, but I’m at Webstock because when my friend Amanda Palmer was performing here in 2011, she somehow convinced them that a scraggly accordion player who doesn’t really like social media would be a good fit. And this year they were kind and crazy enough to invite me back!

4) What are the most important issues currently in your field?
There’s a lot of talk about whether it is possible to make a living off of music in a world where fewer people are paying for music. I’m more concerned with how to make music something special and rare in a world where music is everywhere all the time. I suppose these things are not entirely unrelated.

5) Tell us more about your talk at Webstock – why should folks come listen?
Why should folks come listen? Maybe they shouldn’t actually. I mean – my talk is at the end of the day, they’ll be tired, wanting to get to dinner or something.

6) Who are your greatest influences?
There are so many! Here are a couple –

Herman Hesse. His writings did something to me – caused an almost hallucinogenic disorientation with ultimately a very specific spiritual trajectory. At a fragile point, it helped me find my path.

Lois Jameson. My sixth grade teacher. She was one of the first people to ever really inspire me to be a creative person and live an unconventional life. She gave me lots of encouragement early on, but what resonates more now is that she was very perceptive about some of my faults. She died shortly after I was lucky enough to be in her class and I think of her quite often still.

7) Tell us three things you love (eg movies, albums, songs, poems, artifacts) and why.
I love so many things!
You have to narrow it down!
Hmmm…. I’ll just pick a category, how about Tall Things?!

Watts Towers
These sculptures were built outside Los Angeles by a single man over the course of decades. Nobody knows why he built them. After he left, the city wanted to tear them down, but somehow they still stand. I wept when I first went there – it struck me as one of the most beautiful things I’d ever seen – something about the mad tenacity of creation.

“The Two Skyscrapers Who Decided to Have a Child” by Carl Sandburg
This is from a collection of children’s fairy tales called “Rootabaga Stories”. The stories feature vegetables and accordions and all of my favorite things, but this little story, overflowing with heartbreak and whimsy, is the one I always come back to.

Giraffes
I want one.
Jason and giraffe

Seven things: Frank Chimero

1) Who are you?
This is a weird question—you sent me this email, you should know who I am. Anyway, I’m Frank Chimero. I’m a designer who writes. I live in New York.

2) What do you do?
See above. I also spend a lot of time thinking about dogs and music. Again, another weird question.

3) How did you end up here?
Took the Q train to Atlantic, then got on the Long Island Railroad to Jamaica Station, then got on the AirTrain (not an actual train in the sky, but one that goes to the airport) out to JFK, then flew to LA, got on another plane, lost a day in the air, landed in Auckland, then boarded a little puddle jumper out to Wellington. Other than that, I spent about a decade designing publications and things for the internet, and about seven or so years writing about everything I learned/decided/unlearned.

4) What are the most important issues currently in your field?
I design things for the web, and the web’s problems are the world’s problems: privacy, equality, corporate ethics, consolidation, wealth distribution, and an over-saturation of loud, fast, and stupid. Now I’m bummed. See what you did?

5) Tell us more about your talk at Webstock – why should folks come listen?
Here’s the thing: we actually do a pretty poor job of getting down the big patterns of making things for screens. Maybe we take our knowledge for granted, maybe we lack words, perhaps its the absence of a catchy conceptual framework—whatever. At the end of the day, if you want to honor making things for the web as a proper craft, I believe it’s necessary to think about the natural grain of the web and how it guides your work. You need to understand it as a material to work with and not a canvas to paint on. It’s not blank—the web has certain things it wants to do. I’ve been trying to spell out my version of these things for a while. This talk is the back half of a lecture I gave last year called What Screens Want, where I dig into what it means to natively design for screens. That last talk focused on flux, or the capacity for change. This time I’m tackling edgelessness.

6) Who are your greatest influences?
Jim Henson, Ray & Charles Eames, Björk, James Burke, Janelle Monae, Montaigne, and David Byrne.

7) Tell us three things you love (eg movies, albums, songs, poems, artifacts) and why.
This is 30 minutes of kinda ambient synth music for plants. And I like it, too! Funny story: the only way to get this record was to buy a mattress from a Simmons dealer in southern California in 1976. Logical.

Let’s spend a long time looking at this photo of Twiggy and Richard Avedon dancing at work. Let’s not forget to have that much fun sometimes, ok?
Dancing

This drawing, for obvious reasons.
Bart